Scion IQ Forums banner
21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I'm going to attach a portion of the change document. But yeah it refers to an "Adjustment" document which is a pain to follow. (Hopefully Toyota doesn't give me any trouble but it's not the whole thing)....

So pulling out the tube, aka "oil filler tube", leaves a lot of fluid?

I agree that your method is much simpler....
Yes, there is at least 2 quarts of fluid that's untouched when you remove the tube. You can see from this screen capture where the top of the drain hole is on the pan. Everything in the pan would be left behind. You have 3 options: leave it in, drop the pan, or suck it out. ;)
Hood Automotive tire Automotive design Automotive lighting Bumper


My approach is the same simple approach used by many transmission fluid exchanges. Put back in the same amount of fluid that you extract. ;)

I'm surprised that no one else is performing a fluid exchange like I am. Maybe this will become the new standard? ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: jzchen

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Yeah, I was thinking about trying to go through the fill hole as well. Not sure if it reaches all the way into the pan. Having an oil extractor like this would also make the job much faster and save time on cleaning that shopvac https://www.amazon.com/OEMTOOLS-24397-Liter-Evacuator-Dispenser/dp/B00LCEWR4A/

I don’t have much issue with refilling though. If I recall correctly, the drain plug can be reached with the car on the ground, while the fill port can be reached behind the wheel (although my tube happened to fall out and made a huge mess :).


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
2014 Scion iQ
Joined
·
776 Posts
This is very strange to say the least. Toyota should know that that elevated drain hole would leave a significant amount of fluid left.

On PriusChat there is always debate on whether the WS transmission fluid should be changed, and at what interval. The service literature does not have a change interval but does say to check the condition of the fluid at certain points/mileage.

I brought up a point from solution chemistry. Up to a certain point solute will dissolve into a solvent until the solution is saturated. Is this why they decided to leave some old fluid in? Intentionally leaving oil fluid with some solute on purpose? I mean they could have left the pan flat and raised the height of the overflow tube the same amount...

Thoughts?

Sent from my REVVL V+ 5G using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Yeah, I was thinking about trying to go through the fill hole as well. Not sure if it reaches all the way into the pan. Having an oil extractor like this would also make the job much faster and save time on cleaning that shopvac https://www.amazon.com/OEMTOOLS-24397-Liter-Evacuator-Dispenser/dp/B00LCEWR4A/

I don’t have much issue with refilling though. If I recall correctly, the drain plug can be reached with the car on the ground, while the fill port can be reached behind the wheel (although my tube happened to fall out and made a huge mess :).


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The method I use is incorporates a gallon bottle inside of the Shopvac to capture the fluid so the Shopvac doesn't get messy unless the hose falls out of the bottle. ;)
Water Boat Fluid Naval architecture Liquid


Plant Cookware and bakeware Flowerpot Gas Machine


With the top port fill hole, I can refill the transmission without any hand tools or lifting the vehicle up off the ground. ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: jzchen

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
The method I use is incorporates a gallon bottle inside of the Shopvac to capture the fluid so the Shopvac doesn't get messy unless the hose falls out of the bottle. ;)
View attachment 17262

View attachment 17263

With the top port fill hole, I can refill the transmission without any hand tools or lifting the vehicle up off the ground. ;)
Ah, good point, very cool idea with shop vac! I guess another option is to use a vacuum brake bleeder - they come with fairly slim hoses and have a handy scale for measuring liquids.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Ah, good point, very cool idea with shop vac! I guess another option is to use a vacuum brake bleeder - they come with fairly slim hoses and have a handy scale for measuring liquids.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I looked at a few of those and found that some of those tools can't handle anything above 1/2 gallon of fluid at a time. This setup was very cost effective and most DIYers have a shop vac on hand to work with. I did look at an electric pump but I wanted to make sure my method was going to work before investing into that type of setup. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
While watching a video on South Main Auto (Eric O), he demonstrated a drill powered pump he got from the Mac tool truck. I found a similar tool made by Tool Guy Republic (part number HT-1715) which costs about $100 shipped. I just ordered it and will post up on how well it performs or doesn't perform when compared to the shop vac process. It should be much better as it isn't as bulky and you can easily see the fluid level in the drain jug. It should only take a few minutes to drain and another few minutes to fill using this tool. ;)

Video.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jzchen

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
No way on this climate change planet would I ever mess with the cvt. That is 89 dollar toyota job sir. If you put too much or too little fluid you are pooched and your car is a big ol paperweight.
Goodluck be careful and do not screw it up trying to save a c note.
 

·
Super Moderator
2014 Scion iQ
Joined
·
776 Posts
No way on this climate change planet would I ever mess with the cvt. That is 89 dollar toyota job sir. If you put too much or too little fluid you are pooched and your car is a big ol paperweight.
Goodluck be careful and do not screw it up trying to save a c note.
The official instructions to change the CVT fluid are more complex than for our '13 Porsche Panamera GTS PDK. I think $89 is worth it (if that is the cost to have it done properly).

Sent from my REVVL V+ 5G using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
No way on this climate change planet would I ever mess with the cvt. That is 89 dollar toyota job sir. If you put too much or too little fluid you are pooched and your car is a big ol paperweight.
Goodluck be careful and do not screw it up trying to save a c note.
There's no way the dealership is going to do a fluid change on the iQ fer $89. The fluid alone is about MSRP $100. Add in an hour or two for the labor and yer out the door fer about $400. I've already made one exchange using my shop vac setup with no issues. I'm looking to make the process simpler vs what the dealership performs. I can still have the dealership perform the fluid level check process if needed. ;)
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top