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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Doing some research on adapting a bypass filter and external cooler fer the CVT and I came across some pictures of the Aisin K41B transmission. Seems there are 2 plastic plugs that were installed by the factory with o-rings. One is just above the fill port (you can see it on the left side of the picture) and the other by the transmission cooler (circled in blue). It would seem that the one by the cooler would be ideal fer a dipstick since it looks like it reaches into the pan. Any thoughts? ;)
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Doing some research on adapting a bypass filter and external cooler fer the CVT and I came across some pictures of the K41B transmission. Seems there are 2 plastic plugs that were installed by the factory with o-rings. One is just above the fill port (you can see it on the left side of the picture) and the other by the transmission cooler (circled in blue). It would seem that the one by the cooler would be ideal fer a dipstick since it looks like it reaches into the pan. Any thoughts? ;)
View attachment 17111
The change procedure does not require a dipstick, although you probably know that already
Other than that, it’s an interesting idea. I’m not sure if there is a way to find out if it is indeed the place for a dipstick, since IQ’s transmission is exclusive to IQ.


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The change procedure does not require a dipstick, although you probably know that already
Other than that, it’s an interesting idea. I’m not sure if there is a way to find out if it is indeed the place for a dipstick, since IQ’s transmission is exclusive to IQ.


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Yes, I'm aware of how the current method of changing out the CVT fluid is rather messy or lackluster fer the amount of money being spent at either by a dealership/shop or DIY. I'm looking into using one of the capped pressure testing ports as my method fer changing out the fluid as well as installing a bypass filter and external cooler. I know CVT pressures can git up into the 800psi range so I know the bypass filter system will need a restrictor orifice that can handle that amount of pressure. I'm thinking at idle and in park, the pressure shouldn't be that high which would allow a valve to be installed so I can just open/close it when I need to drain out the CVT fluid to be measured and the appropriate amount filled in. Repeat until the fluid is as clean as possible. The valve would be removed after the fluid exchange. ;)
 

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Yes, I'm aware of how the current method of changing out the CVT fluid is rather messy or lackluster fer the amount of money being spent at either by a dealership/shop or DIY. I'm looking into using one of the capped pressure testing ports as my method fer changing out the fluid as well as installing a bypass filter and external cooler. I know CVT pressures can git up into the 800psi range so I know the bypass filter system will need a restrictor orifice that can handle that amount of pressure. I'm thinking at idle and in park, the pressure shouldn't be that high which would allow a valve to be installed so I can just open/close it when I need to drain out the CVT fluid to be measured and the appropriate amount filled in. Repeat until the fluid is as clean as possible. The valve would be removed after the fluid exchange. ;)
Not really messy, not more than an oil change - you don’t need to take off the pan, he explains it in the second part of the video :) ( or maybe there’s another video on it, don’t remember) But I like your idea!


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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
You can see by the design of the pan with the tube removed that there is a significant amount of fluid left in the pan. The drain opening is near level with the lip of the pan and the majority of the fluid in the pan will never be drained out using the tube method. That leaves you with dropping the pan and the associated mess and gasket replacement. ;)
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With the "dipstick" port, it could be easily used to suction out the fluid without the mess, issues, or cost of dropping the pan. This port could also be used to measure the fluid in the CVT (cold or hot) as well since I'm going to guess it should not overflow above that port. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
So now I'm thinking of using that dipstick port to suction out the old fluid, measure and refill with the same amount removed through the dipstick port. Then use one of the pressure ports to purge the fluid out with the engine on. Repeat the process until the fluid is as clear as possible. I guess I'll have to order a couple of the 4 liter cans of the CVT fluid at around $90 per can. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I did find that Aisin markets a CVT-FE fluid. I'm picking up 8 quarts and will be comparing it to the Toyota CVT-FE fluid. At half the price of the Toyota fluid, this should make the fluid exchanges much more economical. I did discover that ExxonMobil makes the Toyota CVT-FE fluid. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was able to git under my iQ today to figure out how to git to the plug. It's just below the bottom cooler hose and to the right of the cooler and can be accessed from the cross beam but it will be a bear to git the current plug out as there isn't much of a tab to pull on with the limited amount of space. I'll have to see if I can git some Vice grips on that plug tab to pull the plug out of there. ;)

It would better to order the 35150-48010 plug (has a bigger tab and a hole in the tab fer easier removal) and replace the existing plug with the newer version. I might have to look into making my own tube to fit into the access port and make it easier to work with. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It might be possible to perform a fluid exchange using the two plug holes. The one at the firewall to extract with and the one by the fill bolt to fill with. Using these two holes could also open up the possibility of using an external pump to run a bypass filter and cooling setup as well. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I finally got around to exchanging out my CVT fluid. It is way easier with this method than the "factory" or modified "factory (dropping the pan) method. I was able to suction out about 3.5 quarts of CVT fluid. I lost half a quart on my cardboard when I initially removed the rear plug. My old fluid had about 102,000 miles on it. ;)

Old CVT fluid...
Drinkware Tableware Serveware Kettle Drink


New Aisin CVT fluid...
Liquid Hood Fluid Cone Drink


The port in the rear does reach the pan as I was able to suction out a lot of fluid from this port. I'm not sure about the port above the fill bolt but my tube did seem like it would reach the pan. I believe this port is best to check the fluid level with. ;)

First...do not remove the rear port plug until you've either jacked the rear up or drained the pan using the factory method. The fluid level is above this port and will spill out when you remove it if the vehicle is level or the front is lifted. Yes, I found out the hard way. :(

Removing the OEM plugs were a bear to remove. I removed any debris around the plug first and then twisted it to break it free. It's only an o-ring and 4 tension feet to keep the plug in place but that little stub doesn't give much to grab onto. I used vice grips, flat screwdrivers, sharp blades to try to grab it and pull it out of the hole. I eventually got it with popping it up with some screwdriver leverage. ;)

Here's the original and replacement plugs side by side. The new plug can be removed with just fingers and no tools. Part number fer the new plug is 35150-48010. ;)
Gas Machine Plastic Chemical compound


After wiping up about half a quart that spilled out of the rear port, I was able to stuff the tubing into the port and fed about 12" of tubing into the port. It took about 15 minutes with my rough shop vac setup to suction out the 3.5 quarts into the gallon jug. I had to stop and check the fluid level just to make sure it wasn't going to overflow the jug.
Water Boat Fluid Naval architecture Liquid


Plant Cookware and bakeware Flowerpot Gas Machine


With both plugs replaced with the newer plug, it's so much easier to drain and fill. I'll need to look at making a pair of tubes that will be permanently installed so I can drain and fill from under the hood instead of crawling underneath the vehicle. ;)

Automotive tire Bicycle part Rim Automotive wheel system Motor vehicle


Automotive tire Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system Gas Motor vehicle

Water Automotive tire Bicycle tire Tire Rim
 
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Thank you for sharing! Sorry you had to kind of guesstimate how much to refill due to the spill. The Toyota service method is very DIY unfriendly except for the display of temp that you can pull up on the instrument cluster. I personally do not have and flat level surface to do it that way as well...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you for sharing! Sorry you had to kind of guesstimate how much to refill due to the spill. The Toyota service method is very DIY unfriendly except for the display of temp that you can pull up on the instrument cluster. I personally do not have and flat level surface to do it that way as well...
It was a total surprise when I pulled that rear plug out! I got CVT fluid all over me in the process while I was trying to stuff the plug back in to the port hole. At least I'm pretty sure I can measure the CVT fluid level from the filler port. I'll just have to figure out the proper measurement method/procedure. ;)

With this method, you don't need a flat level surface to perform this fluid exchange. ;)

I now know I should put the rear up on ramps before I suction out the CVT fluid so the fluid doesn't flow out of the rear port. As the vacuum draws out the fluid, I lift the front end so it is higher than the rear so the fluid can flow to the suction tube. My goal is to be able to drain and refill the CVT in about the same amount of time it takes to do an motor oil change. As I git more proficient with this method, I should be able to perform an exchange in record time. This method is strictly a measurement setup and I feel a better DIY friendly method and not as temperature dependent. I guess ideally the old and new fluids should be at the same temp to allow fer any expansion errors. ;)

I used 5/16" ID tubing this time around. I will try some larger tubing (maybe 3/8" but 1/2" is too big and the OD won't fit into the port) and see if the larger tubing will help in extracting the fluid faster. I know that the larger tubing will help in filling the transmission faster. I'm looking at some of the other manufacturers fer their dipstick solutions. Maybe I can adapt one of those to fit in the K41b transmission. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm eyeing the flexible transmission dipsticks now. There's a good chance that it might fit in the fill port. If it does fit, it will come down to the proper calibration fer the fill line. ;)
 
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I'm sorry I delayed responding to this thread I do have the instructions on how to refill. I'll have to try to find it but haven't gotten a chance. (Busy week all of a sudden). I got it subscribing here:


All repair info is there. It is $20 for two days last I checked people will print to .pdf their own repair manuals. I did. I almost negotiated with someone to send all I compiled if I could confirm Toyota got their $20 but got a little suspicious plus was out of town and nothing became of it.

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That big bolt is in the refill hole.

The bottom of the pan there is an "overflow plug" AND "oil filler tube". (All "temporary" reuse old gasket)

1 remove "refill plug".
2 remove "overflow plug". 6 mm hex socket
3 remove "oil filler tube". 6 mm hex socket
Fluid drains out.
4 install oil filler tube 0.8 Nm.
5 add fluid to refill hole until it flows out overflow plug hole.
6 when slows to drops plug temporarily.
7 add 0.4 L.
8 temporarily install refill plug.

To be continued need to pick my son up from school....
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm sorry I delayed responding to this thread I do have the instructions on how to refill. I'll have to try to find it but haven't gotten a chance. (Busy week all of a sudden). I got it subscribing here:


All repair info is there. It is $20 for two days last I checked people will print to .pdf their own repair manuals. I did. I almost negotiated with someone to send all I compiled if I could confirm Toyota got their $20 but got a little suspicious plus was out of town and nothing became of it.

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Yes, I'm familiar with the Toyota procedure but not a fan of it. I thought I'd try something a little more simpler. There is no mention of using the port plugs but it would make sense to use them if they are there. This could also be used to grab a sample of the transmission fluid to see it's condition vs using the bolt fill hole. ;)

I will test using the fill port to see if I can extract the same amount of fluid from my CVT and possibly eliminate a few more steps in the process. I will be able to determine the lengths and type of tubing one needs to perform the fluid exchange. My goal is to make this a tool-less and simple endeavor. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That big bolt is in the refill hole.

The bottom of the pan there is an "overflow plug" AND "oil filler tube". (All "temporary" reuse old gasket)

1 remove "refill plug".
2 remove "overflow plug". 6 mm hex socket
3 remove "oil filler tube". 6 mm hex socket
Fluid drains out.
4 install oil filler tube 0.8 Nm.
5 add fluid to refill hole until it flows out overflow plug hole.
6 when slows to drops plug temporarily.
7 add 0.4 L.
8 temporarily install refill plug.

To be continued need to pick my son up from school....
Keep in mind that the factory process only removes around 2 liters of fluid while the other ~4 liters remain in the torque converter and pan. ;)

My process should go something like this:

1. Remove filler port plug.
2. Insert tubing into the port hole until it bottoms out on the bottom of the pan. Lift the tubing up about 1/4" to allow fluid to be suctioned into the tubing.
3. Thread tubing into the shop vac and place into at 1 gallon or 5 quart jug. Secure the tubing so it can't pop off of the jug.
4. Close up the shop vac and turn it on. Observe that the fluid is being extracted into the tubing.
5. Turn off the shop vac when the fluid is extracted. Open the shop vac up and measure the contents of the old fluid.
6. Extract the tubing from the port hole. Insert funnel into the port hole.
7. Add in the same amount of new fluid into the transmission. Remove the funnel from the port hole.
8. Reinstall the port plug.
9. Start the engine and observe that there are no leaks.

No hand tools, no fuss, no mess. ;)
 

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I'm going to attach a portion of the change document. But yeah it refers to an "Adjustment" document which is a pain to follow. (Hopefully Toyota doesn't give me any trouble but it's not the whole thing)....

So pulling out the tube, aka "oil filler tube", leaves a lot of fluid?

I agree that your method is much simpler....
 

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