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A little DIY on changing the oil in your iQ. Let me point out at the start that I DID NOT read the directions and did the job old school. This is NOT the correct way to do it. I have not seen a canister type oil filter like the one on the iQ. If I had read the directions it would have been much easier and much less of a mess. That being said here is what to do (with corrections added as we go).

First off, be safe. Whether you use a floor jack or car ramps, set your parking brake. I use car ramps.




Here is what you'll need...

Four quarts of 0w-20w synthetic oil (that weight is always synthetic)
One oil filter (I use the Toyota brand)
14mm wrench
1/4" drive rachet
64mm oil filter removal tool
Drain pan
Rags or towels
Funnel









Here are the directions on the oil filter replacement (READ THEM AND SAVE YOURSELF A BIG MESS)



The oil drain plug and oil filter canister located under the motor on the passenger side of the vehicle.





Use the 14mm wrench to loosen the oil drain plug.



Allow the oil to drain from the iQ into a pan.



Clean the oil drain plug and threads.



Once the oil has stopped dripping you can remove the oil filter canister.

THIS IS WHERE IT WOULD BE EASIER TO FOLLOW DIRECTIONS. There is a small indentation on the end of the oil filter canister that allows you to connect a 1/4" ratchet and remove the small cap. Once this small cap is removed you place the plastic spout, with some force, into the opening and a valve inside opens to allow the oil from the canister to drain out cleanly into the pan. Once the oil has drained from the spout it is removed and you can move on to the next step, removing the oil filter canister.


Connect the 1/4" ratchet to the oil filter canister removal tool and place on the end of the canister.



Loosen the canister until you can remove it by hand. If done correctly (using the spout mentioned earlier) the job will not be this messy.



Now that you have the canister out, pour out the remaining oil and clean the housing.



Your parts from the Toyota oil filter. (notice the white plastic spout that would have made this job so much easier)



Remove the used oil filter element.



Compared to the new one.



There are two O-rings that need to be replaced. Do not reuse the old ones. This view is the small O-ring under the cap that is on the bottom of the canister. (the one that should have been removed while the canister was still on the vehicle)



Replace it with the new O-ring and apply motor oil to it to prevent leaks and sticking.

Replace the large O-ring with the new one and apply motor oil to it as well.



Now install the new oil filter element.



Reassemble the oil filter canister, the cap on the bottom and place it back on the vehicle in reverse order from removal.

Re-install the oil drain plug using the 14mm wrench.

Add 3.7 quarts of motor oil using a funnel. The oil intake is located on the passenger side of the motor.





The oil capacity information can be found in your iQ owners manual.





Once the oil has been added, check the dipstick (dip cable in the case of the iQ) and make sure your level is at the full mark.

The dipstick is located mid engine.





Replace the oil filler cap and start the iQ. Check for oil leaks under the vehicle.

As always dispose of your used oil in an appropriate container and disposal site. I'm lucky in Huntington Beach, they come to the door and pick it up.



The owners manual suggests changing the oil at 10,000 mile intervals but I'm a little old school. 5,000 miles is max for me.

I'll post up pictures of the correct way to do it at the next oil change.
 

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You mentioned 'plastic spout'.
Can you elaborate? Is there another aid to drain the oil from the canister?
 

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Thank you Taz for the time spent putting this together.
Very helpful... I also like to do stuff on my own rather than handing out the car to ???

We owe you one... (two? three?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
On the bottom of the canister there is a notch cut out that fits the knob on a 1/4" ratchet. Using the ratchet you can loosen and then remove the cap. Once the cap is removed there is a valve inside. Using the white plastic "spout" included with the new oil filter element you push it into the valve with some force to open the valve. The oil then drains out of the spout rather than draining when you remove the entire canister. It's a new design and will make the job much easier and cleaner. Next oil change I'll take pictures of it and post up.
 

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surfcitylocal,
Nice job documenting the oil change procedure. I always DIY the oil change on all my vehicles.
 

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Although I have no reason to go the DIY route, I am amazed that you were able to do it AND handle a camera. Well done, sir!!
 

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I don't have a place to do it myself and am now a little paranoid that they'll get it wrong when I get it serviced lol
 

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I don't have a place to do it myself
Ditto here...and I find that if I am missing anything at all needed to do the job properly, I generally do well to leave it to someone else. It is good, however, to know as much as one can about the process in order to apply due vigilance should a project be out-sourced. For me that's why DIYs are so valuable and appreciated.
 

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This is the same filter that they use on th xD. If the cap gets messed up its 54.00 for a new one but Taz this is a good DIY that you did.
 

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Ditto here...and I find that if I am missing anything at all needed to do the job properly, I generally do well to leave it to someone else. It is good, however, to know as much as one can about the process in order to apply due vigilance should a project be out-sourced. For me that's why DIYs are so valuable and appreciated.
And since it comes with complimentary service, it'd be harder for me not to. I guess I have three years to find a place and eventually learn how to change my own oil :D
 

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I DIY the oil change on my IQ at 5K and used 0W20 Mobil1 and Toyota oil filter.

I did take my IQ to the dealer for the 5K service and they rotated the tires. I guess I will take it in for the free 10K service/oil change but really prefer to do it my self. Normally I never take my vehicles to a dealer for service as it is easier and faster to DIY and I know what gets done but I never had free before. Kinda worried me watching as they said that they had never done a IQ before.

BTW, it's a 3/8" ratchet to remove the bottom plug in the filter canister.

EDIT: Forgot to mention that I installed a magnetic drain plug as I do in all my vehicles. Belt and suspenders kind of thing and probably unnecessary but I like to see if any metal collects on the MDP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nothing wrong with adding a magnetic oil drain plug, you can't be too careful.
 

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Great topic...thanks for posting this! I'm wondering what engineer at Toyota decided to use such a PITA oil filter cartridge? Gesh, sometimes old-school stuff is just fine and doesn't need to be reinvented. (I find no added benefits with this new design...seems to only add more stuff to mess up and adds time to the job.)

I got two years of free maintenance with my iQ but I'll be doing this job myself afterwards....I'm retired military and live down the road from the Air Force Academy so can use their Auto Shop facility for just a couple of bucks....complete tool kits, lift racks, and free oil/fluid disposal. (Plus a full-time mechanic to help out.)
 

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Great topic...thanks for posting this! I'm wondering what engineer at Toyota decided to use such a PITA oil filter cartridge? Gesh, sometimes old-school stuff is just fine and doesn't need to be reinvented. (I find no added benefits with this new design...seems to only add more stuff to mess up and adds time to the job.)

I got two years of free maintenance with my iQ but I'll be doing this job myself afterwards....I'm retired military and live down the road from the Air Force Academy so can use their Auto Shop facility for just a couple of bucks....complete tool kits, lift racks, and free oil/fluid disposal. (Plus a full-time mechanic to help out.)
I felt like you at first, but then once I got to thinking about it I realized that there are two major advantages.

advantage one. If you use the plastic insert and drain the oil before removing the filter housing nut, then you don't get oil all over the place like you do with a traditional spin on filter.

advantage two: unlike a conventional spin on filter, you can see what's actually being filtered out of your oil ( metal shavings, etc). This can let you know how things are going on inside your engine.

Like I said at first I agreed, what a pain in the butt? Then I slowed down my thinking process and realized, not such a bad idea after all :)


What makes less sense to me is changing oil every 10,000 miles that ridiculous! Even the best synthetic oil in the world gets nasty dirty, even after as little as 3000 miles. I have always changed my oil every 3000 miles synthetic or not. I completely understand that the new synthetic oils do not loose their thermal viscosity as fast as conventional oil, but they do get black as tar just as fast! To those of you who want to change their oil every 10,000 miles like the manual, says that's completely up to you and won't void your warranty. I will say this though, my average car lasts well over 300,000 miles and without any engine rebuild. I must be doing something right!
 

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Thank you Taz for taking the time out to write this helpful DIY. Personally, I subscribe to changing oil at 5,000 Kms (3,000+ miles) and use Mobil 1. ;) Changing oil more frequently is cheap insurance for engine longevity, IMHO.
 

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I felt like you at first, but then once I got to thinking about it I realized that there are two major advantages.
advantage one. If you use the plastic insert and drain the oil before removing the filter housing nut, then you don't get oil all over the place like you do with a traditional spin on filter.
advantage two: unlike a conventional spin on filter, you can see what's actually being filtered out of your oil ( metal shavings, etc). This can let you know how things are going on inside your engine.
Like I said at first I agreed, what a pain in the butt? Then I slowed down my thinking process and realized, not such a bad idea after all :)
What makes less sense to me is changing oil every 10,000 miles that ridiculous! Even the best synthetic oil in the world gets nasty dirty, even after as little as 3000 miles. I have always changed my oil every 3000 miles synthetic or not. I completely understand that the new synthetic oils do not loose their thermal viscosity as fast as conventional oil, but they do get black as tar just as fast! To those of you who want to change their oil every 10,000 miles like the manual, says that's completely up to you and won't void your warranty. I will say this though, my average car lasts well over 300,000 miles and without any engine rebuild. I must be doing something right!
Can't argue with that.....been doing that for 40 years, the only difference today is that I do it
with Amsoil synthetic, which I believe, used to be and still is, the best synthetic made. I change
mine at 3k intervals also....and never had to rebuild a motor or any serious problem....ever! Oh,
and this next sentence ought to get some responses flying at me, both good and bad.

I want the maximum protection against any wear which is accomplished by using the slickest
synthetic oil with the best viscosity....therefore, I realize that I'm probably sacrificing a little mpg,
but I'm running the Amsoil Signature Series Synthetic 0w30wt.....the very best! It's well worth
the 1-3 miles per gallon less to gain the increased engine longevity.
 
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